KATYA’S BLOG

COMMUNICATION GONE HAYWIRE

The brain of a person with dementia loses information and words, and their connections to both become haywire. This can create recurring obsessional behavior or give rise to repetitive delusional beliefs. Both are commonly a need to communicate something. One woman was obsessed with wanting to know about Princess Diana’s death. She drove her daughter crazy with repeated questions about how she died, when, and why. Subconsciously

Read More

EMPTY SHELL

This story was recently shared. My MIL had Alzheimer’s and for 15 or more years she had not recognized any of her children… or anyone else. She was 78 yrs. old and had fallen and broke her hip, so she had gone to the hospital. They did her surgery and sent her to a Rehab. My husband (her son) and I had gone to see her, she

Read More

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE

We all have moments in our lives where we feel like we are falling down Alice’s rabbit hole. However, people with dementia experience Alice’s journey as a daily occurrence. Strange people, unfamiliar shifting environments, danger, fear, feeling lost, no control over your world, and maybe smiling cats, talking caterpillars, and surreal tea parties. The caregiver also experiences this descent down the rabbit hole by caring for the

Read More

THE SUGAR RUSH

The sense of taste is commonly altered or lost during dementia progression. Interestingly only the taste of sweetness seems to remain even in later stages. It creates a craving, and often caregivers and care facilities seek to placate the person and give them too many sugary “treats.” It is essential to be aware of how excess sugar negatively affects the body and how many of the challenges

Read More

HOME ALONE

In the USA, one-third of those with dementia live alone, and one in seven of those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s live alone. That’s 800,000 people with dementia on their own. There’s an estimated 50 million with dementia worldwide, 60-70% being Alzheimer’s and it is estimated this will triple by 2050. Dementia is a progressive condition that eventually leads to the necessity of being cared for. So, it is

Read More

CONFUSION

written Anonymously These are only a few lines To tell you I’m still alive I am not yet among the dead Although my memory fails And I find myself confused… I got used to my arthritis to my dentures I am resigned I handle my bifocals well, but … Oh my! I do miss my mind. And sometimes I don’t remember When suddenly I find myself at the foot

Read More

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH?

Frank was in his 18th year of Alzheimer’s and deteriorating fast. He was predominately non-verbal and only spoke a few words; he often just shouted unintelligible sounds. He needed assistance to eat, and he was losing weight so rapidly we figured the end must be nearing. I’d often visit at lunchtime to help him eat, and one day this is what happened. The kitchen staff placed the

Read More